creativity

Showing 6 posts tagged creativity

Place has always been important for the emergence of new products and entire industries. They form crucibles wherein people, ideas, and organizations come together. Silicon Valley outpaced established East Coast electronics centers when young engineers and innovators began to cluster there — committed to the place rather than to particular employers. The same is true of Detroit and motor vehicles, Los Angeles and motion pictures, New Orleans and jazz, Nashville and country music, Boston and publishing, Chicago and advertising, New York and visual art, and San Francisco and product design.

Ann Markusen and Anne Gadwa (from Metris Arts Consulting) in Creative Placemaking (PDF), a white paper published by the National Endowment for the Arts on the role of arts and culture in urban planning, livability, and economic development.

"Subjects regarded as making important contributions to creative thinking include art and music, but science and mathematics also score highly." —Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe has released Creativity and Education: Why it Matters, a new study that sheds light on the role of creativity in career success and the growing belief that creativity is not just a personality trait, but a learned skill.

Download the PDF.

(via Dexigner) High-res

"Subjects regarded as making important contributions to creative thinking include art and music, but science and mathematics also score highly." —Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe has released Creativity and Education: Why it Matters, a new study that sheds light on the role of creativity in career success and the growing belief that creativity is not just a personality trait, but a learned skill.

Download the PDF.

(via Dexigner)

Ambiguity and ambivalence — the ability to inhabit different environments and frames of mind at the same time — have become central to our cultural development. They are qualities that embody the openness and flexibility necessary for embracing diversity, and they are critical to the questioning and imagining that are preferred methods of inquiry.

MoMA curator Paola Antonelli on responsive objects and post-digital age design in Talk to Me: Design and the Communication between People and Objects

To invent and to create requires an understanding that incorporates all that is known sensually and abstractly, subjectively and objectively, imaginatively and concretely. And because of their wide disciplinary training in the imaginative skills, handicrafts and expressive languages, only polymaths will have the tools necessary to do so. Thus, the future of innovation will reside, as it always has resided, in the minds of multiply talented people who transcend disciplinary boundaries and methods. We can recognize this phenomenon by fostering artscience—a term promoted by artist-inventor-psychologist Todd Siler (Siler, 1990)—or we can retard it by creating educational and workplace systems that prevent arts and sciences from meeting.

Robert Root-Bernstein in “The Art of Innovation: Polymaths and Universality of the Creative Process,” a wonderful article on artists who study the sciences, scientists who study the arts, and a third group that integrates both — in the International Handbook on Innovation.

Dan Goods talks about working with NASA/JPL as Visual Strategist. Dan is an example of a creative person with a background in art and design working in the field of science. His goal is to make experiences for people to experience science. There’s a funny segment at the beginning of this video where he lists the normal steps for getting a job with JPL and then the ‘alternative path’, which is how he got in.

I’ve been working on my literature review for my thesis. Dan’s work relates directly to research I’ve conducted on creativity and innovation where the arts merge with science. It’s been enjoyable reading Dan Pink’s A Whole New Mind, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s Creativity, and David Edwards’ The Lab. I also feel like I could spend the entire month overloading ideas into my head with TED Talks. They’re definitely “ideas worth spreading.”